Miter Boxes, Mallets & Money: Just A Bunch Of Useful Tools, Sometimes!

Know Your Tools

It is important for a carpenter to know his tools. For instance, a carpenter who is a cabinet maker intimately knows how to use a miter box. And most people, especially carpenters,  know what a hammer is and basically how to use it. Actually, there are several types of hammers that specialize for different functions. There’s is the claw hammer, sometimes called a common hammer, a ball pein hammer, a club hammer, a framing hammer, a sledge hammer and many more that make up the hammer family. Then there is a mallet, which is similar to a hammer but not exactly the same thing. A mallet is a hammer with a large, usually rubber or wooden head, used especially for hitting a chisel. It is the right hammer for wood carving and delicate wood working. But when you use the right hammer in the wrong application, it can be bad, even painful. See, one day, a while back, I used a mallet to try and knock some flooring into position. The flooring was heavy and I  didn’t want to mark the flooring so I used a rubber headed mallet to try and knock it into place. I should have picked up the flooring and moved it by hand, but I was tired and it was late and I had the mallet readily available. So I pounded at the flooring to move it across the floor into place. All went well until it didn’t…on one particular swing I got distracted, took my eyes off the flooring and proceeded to hit myself in the foot with a heavy blow. My initial reaction to hitting myself in the foot was one of embarrassment. But as the sensation made its way to my brain, my embarrassment was quickly replaced with severe pain. It hurt so bad. Bad hammer!

You see, this was a classic example of using a perfectly good tool the wrong way, which resulted in the tool not being productive at all, but being a pain (literally) that hinders progress instead of contributing to it. I guess the moral of the story is that tools are very useful when used (and viewed) correctly, but can be counterproductive if used incorrectly.

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Money Is

Money is similar to a hammer in that when viewed and used properly, is a great tool that can help you achieve your goals, but when used incorrectly, can be counterproductive and possibly painful. Money, being a central part of financial freedom, must be viewed and used properly or else be counterproductive to the pursuit of freedom. This is a good lead-in to defining what money is, and by extension, what money isn’t.

  • Money is: A medium of economic exchange and a tool to build wealth. As a tool, it is like a hammer in that you have to get it (some), learn how to use it, take care of it, use it correctly and manage it so that it provides value to you.
  • Money is: A temptation. If you let money be your goal, be the focus of your desires and the answers to your problems, it can tempt you to worship it, hoard it and let it define you.
  • Money is: A test. As we learn each lesson about money we walk away a little bit wiser and a little better equipped to use it going forward. But if we don’t learn our lessons, we are doomed to repeat our mistakes.
  • Money is: A testimony. Our decisions (wise decisions or struggles) with money and finances in general, are a large part of our testimony to our spouses, peers, neighbors and children.

 

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Money Is Not

It is just as important to define what money is not. Although our western culture wants to paint a picture that money is the root of happiness, power, status and popularity, money is just a tool, not the basis for our identity. Let’s take a look at what money is not:

  • Money is not: A measure of success or our sole goal. There are many successful people that have a lot of money, but not having money does not make you unsuccessful. Likewise, there are/were some incredibly success people that had virtually no money. Many, if not most of your artists, missionaries and teachers fall into that category.
  • Money is not: A component of self-worth. Money is a tool, not something that defines who we are or our value to our families, communities and corporations.
  • Money is not: A reward for good living. Money doesn’t care if you are good or bad. Good living is a reward in itself. If you are a person of faith, you know that the true blessings are things such as peace, joy, love, grace and contentment.
  • Money is not: A guarantee of satisfaction. Money does not guarantee happiness or contentment. In fact, most people who look to money to be their source of satisfaction  never seem to have enough of it.

 

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Use It, Keep It, Take Care Of It But With The Proper Perspective

Money, when kept in the proper perspective (as a tool) and used correctly (as a medium of economic exchange and a tool to build wealth) can lead to financial freedom that includes peace, contentment, options and freedom from worry. But when used incorrectly, as a measure of success, self-worth or a guarantee of satisfaction, can lead to the opposite of freedom: Entrapment, discontentment, misery and, yes, pain, just like that mallet story I told earlier. Our lives change for the better (financial freedom being the main objective) when we view money as a tool and not as our goal.

Looking for more help with your finances? Try Dave Ramsey’s book: The Total Money Makeover. Order here and SAVE!
 
The Total Money Makeover: Classic Edition: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness

2 thoughts on “Miter Boxes, Mallets & Money: Just A Bunch Of Useful Tools, Sometimes!

  1. Good post. I like the comparison. I will use that in the future when talking with people.

    Too many people have the money is the root of all evil mentality when they should just view as a hammer.

    Liked by 1 person

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