Everyday More Salt & Less Pepper: FI Wisdom From Years Of Mistakes & Miscues

While recently getting my hair cut by the same person who has cut my hair for the past 12 years or so, she looked at me sheepishly and said “Mike, times are a changing…it seems like every time I see you, you have more salt and less pepper.” After a moment of bewilderment, I realized she was telling me that my brown hair was gaining more and more gray hair over time. Her statement, while funny, and true, was also a reflection of the years that have gone by in my journey to financial independence. Then I thought about it. Its been 30 years, 8 homes, 6 jobs, 3 kids and 2 careers since I started my FI pursuit. I have learned a lot. Some learning has come from wise decision making, but most, it seems, has come from my mistakes and the steps to overcome them. Here are four FI lessons from many years in the FI pursuit:

 

Tortoise & The Hair

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Rule No.1: Never lose money. Rule No.2: Never forget rule No.1.” – Warren Buffett

Warren Buffet, perhaps the single greatest investor of our time, is credited with this famous quote. Unfortunately, it has taken me the past three decades to get it through my head that loss prevention is the higher priority over the risk of chasing huge returns. See, I have been invested in the stock market all this time. And for most of the time, I only invested in what I knew, which was high tech stocks. At the time I was in the industry. The good news was that high tech stocks have had some incredible returns. Years like 1995 through 1998 come to mind when the annual returns ranged from 20% to 37%. The bad news is that those same stocks had some horrible losses. The years 2001, 2002 and 2008 come to mind. The net result was that I made, and lost, two huge fortunes in the stock market since 1983 with very little to show for it as of the 2008 financial crisis. Hence, starting in 2009, I started to put Warren Buffet’s rules into place and have been rewarded handsomely for it. What I have learned: Slow and steady wins the race, just like the story of the tortoise and the hair. You don’t have to chase high returns with high risk stocks to get a good return. Preventing losses is more important than sporadic years of high returns. In terms of my stock investing, that means investing in high quality stocks, with a proven record of profits, growth and good management operating in good markets. For the most part, I invest in strong dividend stocks which also helps guarantee a decent return. I also re-balance my portfolio to lock in profits and lessen the chance of large losses should the market turn. While I have not had huge annual returns in the past nine years, I have not experienced ANY negative return years. The end result is that compounding the small but regular annual returns have produced more wealth than the previous 25 years of investing combined.

The Few, The Proud, The Life Goals

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“If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time.”― Zig Ziglar

Early in my FI pursuit I had vague, long term goals: Something about retirement, kid’s college, independence and travel. Blah, blah, blah. I focused on climbing the corporate ladder and thought regular promotions would take care of meeting my eventual goals. It wasn’t until the first major stock market crash in 2001 that I realized that my goals were too vague and too long term to foster the best FI actions. It’s true, when you aim for nothing, you hit it every time…and go nowhere! What I have learned: Have specific goals in all aspects of financial independence. That includes quantitative giving goals, savings goals, investing goals, as well as qualitative goals for gratitude, contentment and peace. The reason why? The quantitative goals provide concrete targets that are easily measured for motivation and a sense of accomplishment. The qualitative goals help us round out the true independence spirit (Freedom from worry or anxiety) as well as give more meaning to what FI is all about.

Set It & Forget It

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When I was younger, I would invest regularly, but only after I paid all my bills. Some months I had a lot to invest, but others, not so much. It was irregular at best. Also, as mentioned above,  in those early years, I really didn’t have stated financial goals. The end result was I never knew if I was on track with my saving and investing. What I have learned: As I have aged, and truly learn to appreciate having financial goals and the power of compound interest, I have learned, first, to order the allocation of money as such: Give first, save second, then spend the rest. Meaning, I give to my church and God first because He deserves it. Then I save (pay myself) second after giving to ensure all my savings goals are met. Then, I make my spending plan (budget) based on what is left over, never spending more than I have. Here’s the best part: I use technology to automatically give, save and pay bills so that I am faithful, regular and not consumed with handling money. Simple and easy.

Sacrifice Good For Great

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“There is no progress or accomplishment without sacrifice.”
Idowu Koyenikan

Sacrificing to reach a goal has never been foreign to me. Sacrificing time and effort to get in shape to play high school and college sports was normal for me. Sacrificing fun and parties to get good grades was expected of myself. But somehow, when I got into the working world, and made good money, I didn’t want to sacrifice the trappings of success for the purposes of reaching a bigger, and better, goal. What do I mean by that? I wanted, and got, the bigger house, the nice cars, the big vacations. In some ways, I was trying to stay up with the Jones…and it was very unfulfilling. Bigger homes and nicer cars cost more money and take more upkeep. After a while it felt like my stuff owned me. What I have learned: Foregoing good things, like a bigger home or a nicer car, and using that money for great things like financial independence, helps speed up the process to independence and true wealth, in a big way! I have learned to cherish my smaller home (low taxes, less to clean, less room for stuff to build up) and my old car (paid for) so that I can use the money instead to fuel financial independence! Sacrificing good stuff for great stuff also helps me appreciate everything I have even more. And guess what? I don’t miss the bigger home or nicer car. Sure, they were fun to have but they are not as fulfilling as the long term goal of financial independence.

More Salt – More Focus, More Intention, More Better!

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“There are no mistakes, save one: The failure to learn from a mistake.” – Robert Fripp

Yes, the hair is getting gray-er and the time is flying by. But, a lot has been learned and hopefully, that knowledge can be helpful to others on their way to financial independence:

  • Consistent investment gains in solid stocks are better than the vicissitudes of high risk/reward stocks.
  • Quantitative and qualitative goals help focus FI efforts,
  • Automated Fin Tech tools help assure the Give-Save-Spend prioritized relationship,
  • And, sacrificing good stuff for the sake of great stuff speeds up achieving your FI goals.

Financial independence is not easy, but it is worth it! As one of my kids would say when they were young: It’s more better!

 

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