What Do Aging Athletes And Financial Independence Have In Common?

I am passionate about sports and I have been that way for as long as I can remember. More so playing them than watching them but nevertheless, passionate. It was football, baseball and basketball in high school. Then, football and baseball in college. Followed by softball, basketball, tennis, cross-fit and competitive running thereafter. And all the while, I have lifted weights and worked out as a way of life. I love it. It makes me fit, I feel good and it’s cheaper than a psychiatrist when it comes to working out your daily problems! But over time, or more specifically, advancing in age, has a way of catching up to you when it comes to physical performance!

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I remember playing sports in my twenties and it was so easy to perform: Stretching the muscles was easy, as was gaining strength and endurance. If you got a little bit out of shape, you were able to get it back really fast. It wasn’t until I turned 34 that I realized my first reduction in athletic ability. I lost a step. I was moderately fast and running the bases while playing softball I was thrown out going from first to third on a base hit. For the first time ever!  This was my first dose of reality that athletic ability diminishes with time.

Then, I went into my forties. Now I was introduced to regular soreness after working out, coupled with a longer time period to fully recover from the workout. What used to take 24 hours to recover now took at least 48 hours. In addition, it took considerably longer to get in shape. At a twenty something, it felt like three weeks of solid work would produce a great fitness level. But by forty something, it took every bit of eight or nine weeks to feel really fit and even then, I wasn’t sure if I had reached the highest level of fitness. The other side of it was also true: As a forty something, it felt like six or seven days of not working out resulted in losing every bit of fitness and you had to start over again from the bottom of the fitness ladder!

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Then I reached my fifties…and a further reduction in athletic ability, with more aches and pains, and longer recoveries. It was in my fifties that I had to fully accept my physical limitations as an athlete. I could no longer deny that past performance levels were long gone and unreachable.

What Do Athletics Have To Do With Financial Independence?

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At this point, you might be asking, what does athletic ability have to do with financial independence? And I would understand if you did. But follow me here for just a moment. Because the lessons learned as I have aged as an athlete are directly applicable to the process of obtaining and maintaining financial independence. How, you might say?

First, It’s About Time

As an aging athlete, it takes time to get ready to perform. Much more time than it used to as a younger athlete. You need to take the time to fuel your body right before the workout. You also need to stretch and stretch a lot. In other words, you need to be patient  and prepare correctly before you can really perform.

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The same is true with the pursuit of financial independence. It is over time that one can develop wealth. It usually doesn’t happen overnight, and, expectations to the contrary can build unwanted anxiety or stress. To build wealth that can lead to financial independence requires saving and investing money over a long period of time, in order to produce a return. This patient approach to building wealth, and as a result, financial independence, is both time proven and considerably less stressful. There’s one more piece to the time element to develop wealth and that is compound interest.

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Saving money over time is only the first part of the equation. The second part, and largest part, is investing the money and letting compound interest work to develop an exponential wealth effect. What does that mean? It means that investments over time will produce far more profits than the amount of money you actually put into the investments. It is a multiplying effect. An example: A one time $2000 investment with a 6% annual return will yield $xxx after 40 years. But if you left it accumulate for only 20 years, half the time,  you don’t have half of the 40 year amount, you have only xx% of it. It takes an investment in time, using compound interest, to develop wealth, and it grows more and more each year. Just like it takes time as an aging athlete to prepare for a workout to produce athletic results.

Limitations Can Be Your Friend

As an aging athlete, you have to recognize your limitations or else run the risk of hurting yourself. When I was 21 years old I ran a five minute mile as part of a fitness test in college as we were getting ready for my junior year of college football. I’ve got NO CHANCE of running that same five minute mile now, regardless of my preparation or efforts to perform at my best. I need to accept my limitations or risk being deeply disappointed or getting hurt when I tey. In essence, I need to be content with my diminished performance level.

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Contentment is also a key foundational element when it comes to financial independence. Without contentment (Being happy where you are, while on your way to where you are going), what you have will NEVER be enough. You will always think in your mind: “I need more to be happy, or rich, or successful, or wealthy, or (fill in the blank).” Part of being financially independent is to be independent of envy or perceived need for something to make you complete or happy. In fact, only when we can learn to be content in the moment, combined with gratitude for what we have, can we be truly independent of envy, covetousness and the sense of lack. There is certainly nothing wrong with ambition, but when that ambition prevents you from ever feeling secure, peaceful or blessed, you can never truly be financially independent.

Three Cheers For Consistency

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As an aging athlete one of the most important fundamentals of working out is consistency. You need to consistently stretch, consistently eat right, consistently hydrate and consistently work out because of what I mentioned before about losing your fitness level fast! When you can get into the appropriate consistent rhythm, your workouts and performance can be very rewarding.

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The same is true when it comes to financial independence. I have found that most financially independent people I have met didn’t hit the lottery or write a best selling novel to develop instant wealth, but built that wealth over time with consistent savings and investing. What do most of the financially independent people do consistently:

  • They save money consistently
  • They invest consistently
  • They live on a budget in order to meet their goals consistently
  • They track goals consistently to stay focused and on track

Consistency also lessens the sting of living below your means. If you consistently put money into an emergency fund, a retirement fund and a vacation fund, you eventually get used to that money being “gone” and you don’t miss the spending power in your day to day budget. Consistency is so important to old athletes and people pursuing financial independence alike.

Taking Advantage Of Technology

As you get older, an aging athlete is wise to take advantage of new technology to increase their performance, and comfort. There are new fabrics on the market that wick away your sweat while you perform. Running in the Texas heat, I depend on moisture wicking clothing. There are new shoes of all types that help you run faster, farther and with more comfort. There are new training apps that help you work out at peak performance. There is an abundant amount of new technology that can help you better perform.

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There is also new technology to help you obtain financial independence. There are tools like Mint to help you track your expenses and budget, Acorns to help you save spare change, Robinhood to help you invest and most banks now have automatic deposit and withdrawal for 401K plans and emergency savings accounts. Use technology to achieve your financial plans: In most cases it is easy, cheap (as in free), automatic and efficient.

Last, Know Your Why

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Motivation is paramount when it comes to working out or achieving financial independence. People ask me all the time: At your age, why do you workout so hard, and so consistently? It’s easy. I do it because it makes me feel great, it clears my mind, it challenges me and it helps me sleep so soundly. In other words, my “why” is to feel better and, God willing, live longer. It is worth it to me to put the effort in now, to feel better later. We need to “know our why” in the pursuit of financial independence too. We need to know why we are budgeting, saving and investing because it sure would be fun to live life unrestrained now. It would be fun, but it would not help us reach our goal of financial independence. Our financial independence “why” we sacrifice now is so that we can be independent later. Independent of money worries or stress and to be independent to follow our heart’s desire. To move working from something we have to do to survive, to something that we choose to do if we want to. Financial independence is not easy and it does not happen overnight. Just like trying to get into and staying in shape as an older athlete. But by using time to our advantage, practicing contentment, being consistent, taking advantage of technology and knowing our why, we can better enjoy the process and eventually achieve the goals of feeling good and experiencing financial independence at any age!

If you want more information on financial independence and/or the steps to get there, consider Dave Ramsey’s book “The Total Money Makeover”. Click the image to enjoy instant savings.

The Total Money Makeover: Classic Edition: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness

The Total Money Makeover: Classic Edition: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness