Everyday More Salt & Less Pepper: FI Wisdom From Years Of Mistakes & Miscues

While recently getting my hair cut by the same person who has cut my hair for the past 12 years or so, she looked at me sheepishly and said “Mike, times are a changing…it seems like every time I see you, you have more salt and less pepper.” After a moment of bewilderment, I realized she was telling me that my brown hair was gaining more and more gray hair over time. Her statement, while funny, and true, was also a reflection of the years that have gone by in my journey to financial independence. Then I thought about it. Its been 30 years, 8 homes, 6 jobs, 3 kids and 2 careers since I started my FI pursuit. I have learned a lot. Some learning has come from wise decision making, but most, it seems, has come from my mistakes and the steps to overcome them. Here are four FI lessons from many years in the FI pursuit:

 

Tortoise & The Hair

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Rule No.1: Never lose money. Rule No.2: Never forget rule No.1.” – Warren Buffett

Warren Buffet, perhaps the single greatest investor of our time, is credited with this famous quote. Unfortunately, it has taken me the past three decades to get it through my head that loss prevention is the higher priority over the risk of chasing huge returns. See, I have been invested in the stock market all this time. And for most of the time, I only invested in what I knew, which was high tech stocks. At the time I was in the industry. The good news was that high tech stocks have had some incredible returns. Years like 1995 through 1998 come to mind when the annual returns ranged from 20% to 37%. The bad news is that those same stocks had some horrible losses. The years 2001, 2002 and 2008 come to mind. The net result was that I made, and lost, two huge fortunes in the stock market since 1983 with very little to show for it as of the 2008 financial crisis. Hence, starting in 2009, I started to put Warren Buffet’s rules into place and have been rewarded handsomely for it. What I have learned: Slow and steady wins the race, just like the story of the tortoise and the hair. You don’t have to chase high returns with high risk stocks to get a good return. Preventing losses is more important than sporadic years of high returns. In terms of my stock investing, that means investing in high quality stocks, with a proven record of profits, growth and good management operating in good markets. For the most part, I invest in strong dividend stocks which also helps guarantee a decent return. I also re-balance my portfolio to lock in profits and lessen the chance of large losses should the market turn. While I have not had huge annual returns in the past nine years, I have not experienced ANY negative return years. The end result is that compounding the small but regular annual returns have produced more wealth than the previous 25 years of investing combined.

The Few, The Proud, The Life Goals

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“If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time.”― Zig Ziglar

Early in my FI pursuit I had vague, long term goals: Something about retirement, kid’s college, independence and travel. Blah, blah, blah. I focused on climbing the corporate ladder and thought regular promotions would take care of meeting my eventual goals. It wasn’t until the first major stock market crash in 2001 that I realized that my goals were too vague and too long term to foster the best FI actions. It’s true, when you aim for nothing, you hit it every time…and go nowhere! What I have learned: Have specific goals in all aspects of financial independence. That includes quantitative giving goals, savings goals, investing goals, as well as qualitative goals for gratitude, contentment and peace. The reason why? The quantitative goals provide concrete targets that are easily measured for motivation and a sense of accomplishment. The qualitative goals help us round out the true independence spirit (Freedom from worry or anxiety) as well as give more meaning to what FI is all about.

Set It & Forget It

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When I was younger, I would invest regularly, but only after I paid all my bills. Some months I had a lot to invest, but others, not so much. It was irregular at best. Also, as mentioned above,  in those early years, I really didn’t have stated financial goals. The end result was I never knew if I was on track with my saving and investing. What I have learned: As I have aged, and truly learn to appreciate having financial goals and the power of compound interest, I have learned, first, to order the allocation of money as such: Give first, save second, then spend the rest. Meaning, I give to my church and God first because He deserves it. Then I save (pay myself) second after giving to ensure all my savings goals are met. Then, I make my spending plan (budget) based on what is left over, never spending more than I have. Here’s the best part: I use technology to automatically give, save and pay bills so that I am faithful, regular and not consumed with handling money. Simple and easy.

Sacrifice Good For Great

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“There is no progress or accomplishment without sacrifice.”
Idowu Koyenikan

Sacrificing to reach a goal has never been foreign to me. Sacrificing time and effort to get in shape to play high school and college sports was normal for me. Sacrificing fun and parties to get good grades was expected of myself. But somehow, when I got into the working world, and made good money, I didn’t want to sacrifice the trappings of success for the purposes of reaching a bigger, and better, goal. What do I mean by that? I wanted, and got, the bigger house, the nice cars, the big vacations. In some ways, I was trying to stay up with the Jones…and it was very unfulfilling. Bigger homes and nicer cars cost more money and take more upkeep. After a while it felt like my stuff owned me. What I have learned: Foregoing good things, like a bigger home or a nicer car, and using that money for great things like financial independence, helps speed up the process to independence and true wealth, in a big way! I have learned to cherish my smaller home (low taxes, less to clean, less room for stuff to build up) and my old car (paid for) so that I can use the money instead to fuel financial independence! Sacrificing good stuff for great stuff also helps me appreciate everything I have even more. And guess what? I don’t miss the bigger home or nicer car. Sure, they were fun to have but they are not as fulfilling as the long term goal of financial independence.

More Salt – More Focus, More Intention, More Better!

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“There are no mistakes, save one: The failure to learn from a mistake.” – Robert Fripp

Yes, the hair is getting gray-er and the time is flying by. But, a lot has been learned and hopefully, that knowledge can be helpful to others on their way to financial independence:

  • Consistent investment gains in solid stocks are better than the vicissitudes of high risk/reward stocks.
  • Quantitative and qualitative goals help focus FI efforts,
  • Automated Fin Tech tools help assure the Give-Save-Spend prioritized relationship,
  • And, sacrificing good stuff for the sake of great stuff speeds up achieving your FI goals.

Financial independence is not easy, but it is worth it! As one of my kids would say when they were young: It’s more better!

 

I Think I Have A Better/FASTER Way To Financial Independence! Fact or Fallacy?

I’ll get right to the point:  I think there’s a better and faster way to grow passive income in order to achieve financial independence! We are committed dividend stock investors looking to build wealth through stock market investments. But I’ve been learning/studying for the past two years and implementing a new investment strategy the past nine months and the results are promising. Let me run this income producing investment strategy by you and help me figure out if this is sustainable or just a short term phenomenon that can’t be maintained to and through retirement from full time employment.

Path To Financial Freedom

We’re not much different from your average FI enthusiasts. My wife and I live below our means, have eliminated all debt except the home mortgage, have a six month emergency fund and invest aggressively, including in retirement and taxable accounts,  to develop long term wealth. We have set aside money for our last child’s college fund (two are already out of the house) and we invest in our Health Savings Account for current and future medical expenses. In terms of investments, we are deeply invested in dividend producing stocks and our account is equally dividend between stable, high dividend yield stocks and faster growing dividend growth stocks. Our stocks produce an average 2.8% annual dividend yield, growing about 11.5% annually. All in all, our stock portfolio has averaged a total annual return of 18% including dividends and appreciation over the past eight years. Everything mentioned so far is pretty straightforward and consistent with most FI practices.

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Also consistent with standard FI practices, my wife and I have been planning to develop wealth that is 33 times our expenses (assuming a 3% annual drawdown in retirement to be conservative). While we are well on our way to meet that goal, a new (to us) passive income path presented itself a couple years ago that I have studied and now implemented for the past nine months with incredible (to me) results. The results have been so good that we are re-thinking our FI goals, amounts and timeframes. In addition, the new (fairly) passive income stream seems to be sustainable into retirement.

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Conservative Options Trading As A Significant Passive Income Source

Hear me out. Monthly dividends are and have been a consistent income source. If we didn’t invest another dollar in the stock market and retired in a couple years from now, dividends would produce one third of our income needs in retirement. But its not enough to be safe as the rest of our financial needs would need to come from asset (stock) appreciation and sales. So two years ago we started studying option trading, focusing on a fairly conservative approach to produce additional monthly income. Then, nine months ago, we implemented the following monthly options trading plan:

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  • Each month, we sell out of the money (OTM) puts on premiere dividend and dividend growth stocks to produce immediate income and give us the chance to buy well researched, desired stocks at a discount. If the option expires OTM, then we keep the premium. If the stock price falls and the option is in the money (ITM) then we get the premium and we “get to” purchase a dividend producing stock on sale. Both are wins to us. (In general, we target to earn 1% or more on the monthly option premium each month and use an OTM strike price that is at least 5% lower than the stock price.)
  • Each month, after much research and analysis, sell OTM covered call options on the dividend stocks we own at strike prices that meet or exceed our researched sell price target. If the option expires out of the money, we keep the premium as income. If the strike price is met, we get the premium AND a nice profit from the sale of the stock. All proceeds from the sale of stock are then reinvested in more dividend producing stocks. (In general, we target to earn .5% or more on the monthly option premium each month and use an OTM strike price that is at least 10% higher than the current stock price.)

That’s it. Each option has a one month duration. If the option expires OTM, the money is then reinvested in options for the next month. Some call that “Stock Option Rinse and Repeat”.

The Results, So Far

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Thus far, the options trading income nearly quadruples the monthly dividend income. Take a look at these results:

  • We are averaging a monthly return of 1.79% (or over 21% annually) on the sale of put options. We have made over 250 put option trades in the nine months, with 236 expiring out of the money and 14 put options being assigned. We have purchased great dividend champion and dividend growth stocks on sale, such as ABBV, LOW, QCOM and CSCO.
  • We are averaging a monthly return of .99% (almost 12% annually) on the premiums of covered call options! We have made over 100 covered call option trades in the nine months, with 94 expiring out of the money and 6 call options being assigned. We have sold some great dividend stocks but got a large premium for the sale, at least 10% higher than our target sales price. Usually these sales result because of a higher than normal run up of the stock price. So our covered calls allow us to cash in profits on unusual spikes in price. Then all proceeds from the sales of stocks are reinvested into other dividend stocks. Sales have included stock in CSCO, STX, SBUX and ETP.

Summing up the performance of this income strategy over the past nine months we find that the total income return by adding the monthly option trading premiums to the monthly dividends equals 18.15% on our entire stock portfolio not including stock appreciation. (The stock appreciation during that timeframe was 19.1%) After taxes, fees and other costs, the net return on trading and dividends, or net income, was slightly over 12%.

 

The Total Money Makeover: Classic Edition: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness

So, Working Backwards, Doesn’t That Mean…

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Let’s take that 12% net annual income return and reduce it by a small safety factor to 10% to be conservative. And let’s assume we do not want to spend any of the stock assets nor any of the stock appreciation. Just keep letting that build. Let’s also ignore social security and any other side income. Where does that leave us? I think that leaves us needing an investment base of 10 times expenses to meet our total retirement needs. Let’s take a look at some actual numbers to this situation: If we need $7,000/month to live comfortably in retirement, or $84,000 a year, doesn’t that mean we will need $840,000 of investable assets to produce that income ($840,000 X 10% = $84,000)?

But let’s continue to make the case more conservatively. Let’s assume that you trade options on only a portion of your investments, say only half of your investments. So, for option and dividend income to cover $84,000 in annual expenses, you would need roughly $1.2M of investable assets (This assumes dividends from all of the investments but options trading on only half of the investments).

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The net result: I don’t think we necessarily need an investment account that is 33 times expenses to retire comfortably. I think with conservative options trading in conjunction with a stock portfolio of dividend and dividend growth stocks, that a couple could retire with an investment account that is only 15 times expenses.

Fact or fallacy ? Set me straight…

 

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